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26.5'' Scale length?

Scale length 25.5 neck multiscale standard

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#1 Leydegauss

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 01:43 AM

I have ordered a luthier kit and im waiting for it to arrive. I wonder if ATG would work in a 26.5'' scale length guitar, by the way, would it work in a multiscale guitar?

#2 cags12

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:25 AM

You can specify the scale length all right from the Settings Manager, 26.5" would be Ok. Unfortunately, there is no option to specify the scale per string so no, you cannot specify multi-scale.

ATG will work anyway, the issue is that it will no be optimized for your scale length. What I would do is to set up the scale length in the middle (an average), if it does not sound right on all the strings, I would experiment a little until reaching a point where it sounds good to you.

#3 Henrik

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 05:44 PM

View Postcags12, on 23 August 2017 - 09:25 AM, said:

You can specify the scale length all right from the Settings Manager, 26.5" would be Ok. Unfortunately, there is no option to specify the scale per string so no, you cannot specify multi-scale.

Even though you cannot enter multiple string lengths, you can actually calculate and enter the correct string offsets for a multi-scale instrument.  Here is how:

1. You start by entering the longest string length (Low E in most cases) in the ATG Settings Manager. For this string, you do enter the actual pickup offset.
2. For the other strings, start with the pickup offset (distance) and reduce it by the ratio of the string lengths.  For example:

Low E string (assuming this is the longest) has a scale of 26.5".
If the High E string has a string length of, let's say, 25.5", you take this measurement (25.5) and multiply this by the pickup offset for the High E string.  You then divide the number you get by the string length of the Low E (26.5).
Repeat this calculation for all the other strings.

Here is an example of a fanned fret guitar by Rick Toone that uses the ATG system: http://www.ricktoone...eld-report.html

#4 Leydegauss

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 07:27 PM

Does the Luthier Kit comes with the Settings Manager? I mean, does it come with all things needed to install and use, or do i need to buy and download additional software?

#5 Henrik

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:08 PM

View PostLeydegauss, on 25 August 2017 - 07:27 PM, said:

Does the Luthier Kit comes with the Settings Manager? I mean, does it come with all things needed to install and use, or do i need to buy and download additional software?

The ATG Settings Manager is part of the ATG Utility Applications found here: http://autotuneforgu...y-applications/

Yes, the ATG Settings Manager is used to do all of the setup with the ATG Luthier Kit.  The ATG Software Manager has access to all parameters that needs to be adjusted.

#6 GuitarBuilder

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 10:22 PM

View PostHenrik, on 24 August 2017 - 05:44 PM, said:

Even though you cannot enter multiple string lengths, you can actually calculate and enter the correct string offsets for a multi-scale instrument.  Here is how:

1. You start by entering the longest string length (Low E in most cases) in the ATG Settings Manager. For this string, you do enter the actual pickup offset.
2. For the other strings, start with the pickup offset (distance) and reduce it by the ratio of the string lengths.  For example:

Low E string (assuming this is the longest) has a scale of 26.5".
If the High E string has a string length of, let's say, 25.5", you take this measurement (25.5) and multiply this by the pickup offset for the High E string.  You then divide the number you get by the string length of the Low E (26.5).
Repeat this calculation for all the other strings.

Here is an example of a fanned fret guitar by Rick Toone that uses the ATG system: http://www.ricktoone...eld-report.html

Very useful info, Henrik!  Mind if I copy this on the VGuitar Forum?  Or perhaps you'd like to post it yourself?  Thanks!

#7 Henrik

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

View PostGuitarBuilder, on 25 August 2017 - 10:22 PM, said:

Very useful info, Henrik!  Mind if I copy this on the VGuitar Forum?  Or perhaps you'd like to post it yourself?  Thanks!

Please be my guest.  Don't mind at all if you post this on vguitarforums.com.

Thank you!




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